Clippings

"Let no one say that I have said nothing new: the arrangement of the material is new." Blaise Pascal

February 6, 2014 at 9:06am
1 note

Mr. Hancock recounted, for example, one extraordinary moment in Stockholm in 1967, during a performance by the quintet. “This night was magical,” he remembered. “We were communicating almost telepathically, playing ‘So What’”—one of the group’s signature pieces. “Wayne [Shorter] had taken his solo. Miles was playing and building and building, and then I played the wrong chord. It was so, so wrong. In an instant, time stood still and I felt totally shattered. Miles took a breath. And then he played this phrase that made my chord right. It didn’t seem possible. I still don’t know how he did it. But Miles hadn’t heard it as a wrong chord—he took it as an unexpected chord. He didn’t judge what I played. To use a Buddhist turn of phrase, he turned poison into medicine.”

— The Genius of Miles - WSJ.com

February 5, 2014 at 10:53pm
48 notes
reblogged from appendixjournal
appendixjournal:

The Haitian Declaration of Independence disappeared in the 19th century and was considered lost for over a hundred years. This is the remarkable story of how it was found - as told by Julia Gaffield, who discovered it. 

appendixjournal:

The Haitian Declaration of Independence disappeared in the 19th century and was considered lost for over a hundred years. This is the remarkable story of how it was found - as told by Julia Gaffield, who discovered it. 

February 3, 2014 at 12:36pm
919 notes
reblogged from amandaonwriting

The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location.

— Flannery O’Connor (via amandaonwriting)

January 24, 2014 at 8:08pm
1 note

Again and again, Word is defeated by the basic job of contemporary writing and editing: smoothly moving text back and forth among different platforms.

— Microsoft Word Is Cumbersome, Inefficient, and Obsolete. It’s Time for It To Die.

January 23, 2014 at 4:13pm
6 notes

Do digitized images carry ghosts? Is haunting doubled and complicated by the conversion of memory into property?

— "Slavery, memory, property" by John E. Drabinski

January 21, 2014 at 10:37am
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via @captain_primate

via @captain_primate

January 20, 2014 at 12:05pm
1 note
Not always the case, but … (via xkcd: Automation)

Not always the case, but … (via xkcd: Automation)

January 10, 2014 at 10:07am
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Humanists and scientists alike, trained in the language of survey research, tend to ask of data sets: “Is it a representative sample?” I doubt there is a single dataset of interest to historians that is. But while attempting to normalize away the biases in a sample is the best scientific solution to the problem, the humanistic approach is to understand a source through its biases without expecting it to yield definitive results.

— Sapping Attention: Reading digital sources: a case study in ship’s logs

8:28am
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Twitter archive inside the Library of Congress (by Jason Cochran)

January 5, 2014 at 3:34pm
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Dolores Schwalb took care of over 50 physically and mentally disabled children over the course of her life. Dolores talks about her first child, who she took in at the age of 3 and still cares for today.

Producer: Stephanie Foo

January 4, 2014 at 12:28pm
1 note

Anthony Grafton: The Future of History Books (by hnneditor)

December 24, 2013 at 9:25pm
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(via T. S. Eliot’s “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees”: A Rare Vintage Gem, Illustrated by Enrico Arno | Brain Pickings)

(via T. S. Eliot’s “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees”: A Rare Vintage Gem, Illustrated by Enrico Arno | Brain Pickings)

December 18, 2013 at 8:21am
2 notes

These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

— Sherry Turkle in The Documented Life - NYTimes.com

December 12, 2013 at 10:32am
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(via IBM 224 Dictating Unit, 1960s (dmbb10909) : Duke University Libraries : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive) h/t @andrewjbtw

December 11, 2013 at 3:00pm
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The instrument keeps me humble,” he once told Guitar Player magazine. “Sometimes I pick it up and it seems to say, ‘No, you can’t play today.’ I keep at it anyway, though.

— Jim Hall, Jazz Guitarist, Dies at 83 - NYTimes.com